Scuba diving experience in a Polish lake

As I shared on the blog my experience of my first ever scuba diving a couple of months ago, this summer I went ahead and enrolled myself in the open water course that allows you to dive up to 18 meters underwater. We completed the first three lessons at the swimming pool where we were taught basic things such as the way scuba diving equipment works and other underwater skills.

The lessons at the pool went pretty well for me. I experienced problems maintaining buoyancy and clearing mask when it’s flooded with water. Later on, the clearing of mask part became pretty much doable Β but I was still quite nervous about the buoyancy situation.

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Polish countryside

The second part of the course was open water lessons, which I successfully completed this weekend. Our chosen open water site was a lake in Poland, halfway between Lodz and Poznan, called Jezioro Budzislawskie. Since it’s mid-September, we were prepared for the cold water diving and the incredibly bulky wetsuits that we needed for such water.

The ride through the Polish countryside was very pleasant and it was actually sunny when we arrived at the site. The water looked calm and blue but there was already a group of divers in the water. We unpacked and soon after started changing into the wetsuits.

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Our dive site

It took me about an hour to put on the wetsuit as it was incredibly thick and skintight. There was an extra layer as well – that’s just how cold the water was expected to be. By the time we go into the water, it was cloudy and the first touch of water was a shock to our bodies. But soon after, the temperature became a non-issue as we started focusing more on practicing the skills.

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An hour of getting ready for the cold water

The visibility was very poor, so poor to the point that we could only see 1 meter field from us. We were shown the same skills like in the swimming pool, such as recovering the regulator in case you lose it, getting rid of the weight belt and ascending to the surface, maintaining buoyancy, rescuing your dive buddy if s/he runs our of air etc.

Our dive instructor told us that the lake was unusually unclear when we were there. Due to this, we barely managed to see anything except one fish and some green plants underwater. Β On the second morning, weather cleared for the better and the visibility improved slightly. We mostly swam from one underwater platform to another. I lost track of the group a few times because of the visibility but I found them again in a matter of seconds. I also managed to step on the plants at one point because of having little control over buoyancy but I was careful not to repeat that again. At one point, we were led by the instructor to a colder and darker part of the lake and the water temperature difference was huge. It was a surreal experience. Floating around in cold and dark water when you can see almost nothing.

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The lake was beautiful

After we completed the last dive session and headed towards the beach, I was overjoyed that we finished the course successfully. I was more than glad to change into normal clothes and get rid of all the bulky dive gear that I had to carry around for quite a while. At the end, we were smacked by one of the fins on our bottoms by other divers as a silly welcome tradition. Β I am now officially part of the diving club and look forward to many underwater adventures to come! πŸ™‚

 

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36 thoughts on “Scuba diving experience in a Polish lake

    1. Hi Dai. Thanks! πŸ™‚ Everything except the diving part was actually quite unpleasant, so I was glad I made it successfully till the end. On the first night my right shoulder hurt terribly and I had to take painkillers. But despite it all, I am now certified to dive πŸ™‚ Sitting on dry land with beer sounds like a great idea too hehe.

      1. Hi again, Pooja. I;m just sitting at home waiting for two guests to arrive. I got slightly sunburned this morning while walking back from the supermarket. It’s 27c here right now so not too bad. We had a shower on Sunday morning which I really enjoyed but it only lasted a few minutes. How is it there ?

      2. 27 degrees is still quite hot, Dai. I hope it will become more pleasant in the weeks to come. The mornings and evenings here are quite chilly (under 10 degrees) but in the afternoons it rises to 15-17 degrees so with sunshine, it’s not that bad πŸ™‚ But we get a lot of rainfall during autumn. No need for hats, mittens and winter boots yet however, so it’s not that bad πŸ˜€ I am now leaving work and going to the gym πŸ™‚ Have a nice evening, Dai!

  1. While I would love to do scuba diving I would never do it in a murky lake, only in some clear ocean. I did diving in finnish lakes (only goggles on) and marking some sunken logs to be pulled up and used for cottage constructions etc. I hated it so much as I am just freaked out by such bodies of water πŸ˜€

    1. Haha I know what you mean by that! I’d not repeat diving in a lake again unless the lake is clear. There are few clear lakes for diving in Poland but the one we went to wasn’t it, at least when we were there.. I wasn’t nervous while I was under the water at all though, maybe because we were always in a group of 4 or 2.

      1. I don’t know why but I just hate to swim in lakes or places where the water is murky. As an active swimmer I had triathlons and there I had no problem to swim in lakes but that could be either because of so many other people in the water or due to the adrenalin. alone I just freak out and panic 😁

  2. Pooja, it feels so good to read about your diving adventures and how you are learning and progressing after each trip πŸ™‚ Must be so tough when the visibility was poor! the lake looks so gorgeous πŸ™‚ Kudos to you girl πŸ™‚

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